Donor Stories from the The Dayton Foundation’s 2011-2012 Annual Report

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Beta Eta Omega Chapter: The Spirit of Service and Sisterhood

Michael E. Ervin, M.D.: Optimism about Greater Dayton

Jane B. and Bond R. (Bond) Hattershire: Something for everyone

Barbara N. O'Hara: Sharing a Passion for Her Hometown

Frank J. Winslow and Carol S. Warner: The Spirit of Entrepreneurship

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Beta Eta Omega Chapter: The Spirit of Service and Sisterhood

Scott Behnken and familyA little more than a century ago, nine college-educated African-American women who were one generation removed from slavery, founded the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., on the campus of Howard University. Its mission was simple - to be of service to all mankind. Today this international organization has grown to more than 260,000 women, including more than 160 members in its Beta Eta Omega Chapter established in Dayton in 1934. Together they are dedicated to carrying on the traditions, ideas and goals set forth by the Sorority’s founders.

"The African-American community has been a strong thread in the fabric of our community’s history," said Rosalind Harper, former president of Beta Eta Omega Chapter. "And Beta Eta Omega is making every effort to address the needs in Dayton. We hope thatour small part is helping to strengthen the bonds of our community."

“...we are not here just to breathe air or take up space, but instead to do our part to make our community a better place to live.” said Rosalind R. Harper, former president of AKA Sorority, Beta Eta Omega Chapter, which is a 2012-2013 “I Believe!” Partner.

Community service always has been at the heart of Beta Eta Omega. Over the years its members have built homes for Habitat for Humanity, provided substance abuse and economic workshops for Good Samaritan Homeless Shelter clients, partnered with Abolition Ohio to bring awareness to the issues of human trafficking and encouraged college-bound young men and women by awarding more than $20,000 in scholarships each year through their Ebony Jewels & Gems Cotillion, among other activities.

Today Beta Eta Omega continues their service imperative under the Sorority’s international theme of Global Leadership through Timeless Service, which focuses on social justice, human rights, health, economic security and mentoring.

They also award grants to charitable efforts locally and nationwide through a Charitable Checking Account℠ established with the African-American Community Fund of The Dayton Foundation.

“As a small organization, our sorority felt that The Dayton Foundation was the best mechanism to deliver financial support for our community,” Rosalind said. “The goals, mission and vision of The Dayton Foundation align with our service imperative, our beliefs in diversity and the idea that we all have something to offer. Given the right opportunity, anyone can make a difference.”

“The goals, mission and vision of The Dayton Foundation align with our service imperative, our beliefs in diversity and the idea that we all have something to offer,“ said Rosalind R. Harper.

Like many of her sorority sisters, Rosalind found inspiration for giving through her parents, teachers and church.

"So many of us believe that we exist because of those who paved the way for us," she said. "My parents, for example, worked hard to complete their college education while raising a family. Their commitment to education helped shape my belief that we are not here just to breathe air or take up space, but instead to do our part to make our community a better place to live.

"Giving without expecting anything in return sometimes is difficult for people to understand, but the joy of giving can be so fulfilling," Rosalind continued. "And that is what motivates the giving at the heart of Beta Eta Omega."

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For the first time in The Dayton Foundation’s history, Greater Daytonians have put the Foundation across the $400 million mark in assets. Read more here.

Michael E. Ervin, M.D.: Optimism about Greater Dayton

Leona and Jane DunwoodieDr. Michael Ervin is 14 years into his third career. At 49, he retired from the highly successful Wright Health Associates that he founded and embarked on a new life as a full-time community volunteer.

His desire to help others took root in college, when he accepted a job as an orderly and found real satisfaction in helping people. He went on to become an emergency medicine physician, later leaving Philadelphia for Dayton to head Miami Valley Hospital’s Emergency and Trauma Center. In Dayton he built his career and began his volunteer work that has blossomed into a full-time passion.

"When I came here," he said, "I fell in love with Dayton and its people. Dayton is large enough to have all the amenities, but small enough to welcome new people to jump right in and make a difference. This is a community that rallies around one another."

Among his many volunteer efforts, he has chaired the board of Greater Dayton United Way, chaired the Culture Works campaign, led efforts to develop the Oregon Arts District and co-chaired the Safety Net Task Force for Montgomery County. He co-chairs the Greater Downtown Dayton Plan and the Downtown Dayton Partnership Board of Trustees and is chairman of the board of CareSource.

“When I came here, I fell in love with Dayton and its people,” said Dr. Michael Ervin, a Dayton Foundation donor and 2012-2013 “I Believe!” Partner.

"I get great satisfaction out of doing my small part to make our community better," he said. "It’s the most rewarding thing you can do. I love to see people from different walks of life and perspectives working together for a common good. As a community, we're a whole lot smarter when everyone brings something to the table."

He believes in the importance of giving. "The amount you give is not important - it’s the act of giving itself. And it can be time rather than money. Giving makes people feel part of a project and part of the community."

"I believe that if we have done well, we haven't done it by ourselves," he said. "If we can, we should help others in return."

Most of his monetary philanthropy is through his Dayton Foundation Charitable Checking Account℠ "It’s so efficient and convenient to use," he said.

“The amount you give is not important – it’s the act of giving itself,” said Dr. Michael Ervin.

He sees The Dayton Foundation as a real asset to Dayton and that its grantmaking gives organizations the feeling of community support. More importantly, he believes, the Foundation’s leadership helps get organizations to work together to get things done.

"I am optimistic about Dayton’s future," he concluded. "While we have a lot of work to do, I see so many people with really creative ideas and see lots of positive change coming. I think we've turned a corner and that Dayton will turn itself around and become great again. We have to believe in ourselves, and I am seeing that more and more. It’s exciting."

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Creating a Dayton Foundation fund is easy and can be done in five easy steps. Learn more here.

Jane B. and Bond R. (Dick) Hattershire: Something for Everyone

Kay GeorgeIn the mid-1970s, a United States Air Force transfer order brought then-Captain Bond (Dick) Hattershire and his wife, Jane, to Greater Dayton, but it was the community’s warm and welcoming nature that kept them here.

"Dayton may be moderate in size, but it’s mighty in spirit," Dick said. "There is something for everyone here. It has all of the amenities of a larger city, but it’s small enough that you can be a part of anything."

For Dick Hattershire, who works for Science Applications International Corp., that includes enjoying and participating in the performing arts. A founder and current treasurer of the Bach Society of Dayton, Dick performs with the group’s nearly 60 other singers, including former Foundation President Frederick Bartenstein III. Dick also is president of the Board of Trustees for Classical WDPR and WDPG.

“...the desire to give is a very personal decision. But The Dayton Foundation can help anyone do it more effectively, while maintaining one’s personal intentions,” said Jane and Dick Hattershire, Dayton Foundation donors and 2012-2013 “I Believe!” Partners.

"Growing up, there always was music in my house," Dick said. "When my father or mother wasn't playing the piano, there was classical music on a record player or on the radio. Dayton has such a vibrant arts community that I naturally fell into it. It’s my passion."

While Jane has expanded her husband’s love for the arts to include the ballet, her heart lies in helping those without a voice, particularly children who are in the court system as a result of abuse, neglect or dependency.

Jane was raised to believe that it’s one’s obligation to help others in need. For more than 14 years, she has volunteered as a trained Greene County court-appointed special advocate (CASA) for children whose families are involved with the court system.

"CASAs are a vital link in the Juvenile Court System, providing the Court with pertinent information that might not otherwise be presented," said Jane, who also has volunteered for the Fairborn FISH Food Pantry. "It’s an awesome responsibility and humbling feeling to know that I speak for the best interests of a child."

“Dayton may be moderate in size, but it’s mighty in spirit,” said Jane and Dick Hattershire.

"The families in the court system are no different from the rest of us," Jane continued. "They want the best for their children - a good home, food, education. They just don't always know how to do it. The joy is seeing individuals make major life changes because of the work that I do and the help I may have provided. I'm so proud and impressed by the people I've met. I feel blessed to have this opportunity and to know that I'm making a difference."

To help provide financial support for their favorite charities, the Hattershires opened a Dayton Foundation Charitable Checking Account℠ in 2005. "We have the freedom and flexibility to add to our account when we want to and give as we feel is necessary," Dick said. "The Foundation makes the process very easy."

"At the end of the day, the desire to give is a very personal decision," Dick added. "But The Dayton Foundation can help anyone do it more effectively, while maintaining one’s personal intentions. The Foundation and its staff help make good things happen for our community. I'm not aware of any comparable organization with the breadth of knowledge or depth of involvement as The Dayton Foundation. We like that about them and know that our fund is in good hands."

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Want to learn more about how The Dayton Foundation can help you help others? Visit our Who Here Can Help You page for the staff member who can address your specific question or comment.

Barbara N. O'Hara: Sharing a Passion for Her Hometown

John E. Moore, Sr.As Kettering resident and avid sports enthusiast Barbara O'Hara sees it, sports are a reflection of life. The lessons learned on the playing field help build character, shape lives and bring communities together.

"Through sports you learn trust, dependability, respect for others and discipline. Life, like sports, is challenging. Sometimes you win, and sometimes you lose," she said. But to Barbara, it’s the journey and the teamwork involved that makes good things possible.

She carries this philosophy through to her charitable giving, as well as to her volunteer efforts. Well known in the community as a passionate advocate and fundraising guru for numerous Greater Dayton not-for-profits, Barbara enjoys being a cheerleader for enterprising efforts and inspiring others to become involved. She is a founder of the Greater Dayton Rowing Association, a board member of Dayton History and the new Dayton Performing Arts Alliance, and a volunteer youth mentor for Montgomery County Ohio College Promise.

"I firmly believe that when you live in a city and partake of all that it has to offer, it’s your obligation to help make it a good place to live. That includes giving your time, as well as your charitable gifts," Barbara said. "If I see someone involved in something important for our community that is of interest to me, I think 'I can do that too!' I hope that what I'm doing inspires someone else to do the same."

“This is my hometown, and I care deeply about its future,” said Barbara O'Hara, a Dayton Foundation donor and 2012-2013 “I Believe!” Partner.

Originally introduced to The Dayton Foundation through her attorney, she has found the Foundation to be a good partner in her charitable giving.

"I enjoy doing my part to help launch a project that has the potential to do something great for our community’s future. The Dayton Foundation and my Charitable Checking Account℠ help me to do this," she said. "The Foundation certainly has made me more aware of the needs of local nonprofits that I might want to help motivate, support and nurture."

Barbara also has a scholarship fund through the Oakwood Schools Foundation of The Dayton Foundation to benefit aspiring female athletes at her high school alma mater and a deferred fund that will continue her gifts to her favorite charities in perpetuity.

“I enjoy doing my part to help launch a project tha thas the potential to do something great for our community’s future. The Dayton Foundation and my Charitable Checking Account help me to do this,” said Barbara O'Hara.

"It can be a challenge to know when and how to give wisely, what start-up organizations or entrepreneurial efforts to invest in, what it will take to seed them and watch them grow," Barbara said. "My giving makes me feel privileged and satisfied in knowing that I'm doing what I can to make Dayton be the gem that it once was...and it will be again. This is my hometown, and I care deeply about its future."

To learn how the Charitable Checking Account℠ Service can help you help others, click here.

You also may download our brochures, The Charitable Checking Account℠ Service and Guidelines for Using Your Charitable Checking Account℠.


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Frank J. Winslow and Carol S. Warner: The Spirit of Entrepreneurship

John E. Moore, Sr.Frank Winslow and Carol Warner have that entrepreneurial spirit that runs strong through Dayton’s history. Helping build things is what they love to do - companies, organizations, communities.

As president and founder of NCIC Capital Fund, Frank helps new businesses to get their start and existing businesses to expand through the application of venture capital and management support. The way Dayton will create jobs and prosper, Frank believes, "is to grow our own. That’s why NCIC Capital Fund was formed."

Frank, who moved from Boston 40 years ago, and Carol, who relocated from Atlanta 10 years ago, came to Dayton because of their jobs. But it was the community’s quality of life and acceptance of anyone willing to work and get involved that got them to stay.

They met serving on the U.S. Air & Trade Show Board. Both have been active in numerous organizations, from Carol (who is CFO of Commuter Advertising, Inc.) serving on the new Dayton Performing Arts Alliance Board, to Frank starting the predecessor of Dayton Development Coalition, the Dayton Area Technology Network. Their passion for Dayton is expressed in "helping this community build its spirit of entrepreneurship and continue its great arts tradition."

They do this through their work, philanthropy and volunteerism. "Organizations won't survive without giving service as well as dollars," Carol said.

“Growing a community has to include growing the underpinnings of economic development,” said Frank Winslow, a Dayton Foundation donor and 2012-2013 “I Believe!” Partner.

"Growing a community," Frank said, "has to include growing the underpinnings of economic development." But Dayton’s strong arts culture is an important quality-of-life draw for companies and individuals, Frank believes. "It’s all intertwined," Carol remarked.

Frank became involved with The Dayton Foundation through the Air Show’s educational fund and later established a Charitable Checking Account℠ and joined the Foundation’s marketing committee. "The Foundation, with its credibility and reputation for good management, is the obvious place to go if you're raising money for an organization or cause - or for your own charitable giving."

Furthermore, Carol said, "I was very impressed with the Foundation’s leadership role in making possible the merger that created the Dayton Performing Arts Alliance." "The Foundation’s diverse and inclusive nature is one of its real strengths," Frank added. "Not a lot of people know all the things The Dayton Foundation has made possible. If there is a worthy project in town, the Foundation probably is involved. The Dayton Foundation has a can-do spirit and is a good way for people to be connected to good things in the community."

“The Foundation, with its credibility and reputation for good management, is the obvious place to go if you're raising money for an organization or cause - or for your own charitable giving,” said Frank Winslow.

"Philanthropy is able to do things the government can't," Frank continued. "A community foundation, in particular, can give people a voice. It allows you to round out your community into a great place to live. Dayton would be a whole lot less of a community without The Dayton Foundation."

The Dayton Foundation has had a long history of collaborative community leadership that’s helped to strengthen the Dayton Region. Learn more about our track record of effective leadership, stability and results.

For recent news and updates about The Dayton Foundation, read our press releases online.

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File date: 9.17.14

IN HIS WORDS

Helen Jones-Kelley

“It’s important to me that my children understand just how much their actions can help others, and why they must give back some part of themselves to the community.”
– Helen Jones-Kelley, Governing Board member and donor, on the Helen and Tom Kelley Family Fund.

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